Classes

Classes feature the organization of individual, group, and society. “Special Research Classes” are classes that feature team teaching via seminars where students will acquire the necessary methods and skills for problem solutions in their research activities. In “General Studies Classes”, students will critique project and research achievements and question their social significance. Also, we provide “Specialized Classes”, where students will the necessary knowledge for implementing projects and research, and “Production Seminar Classes”, where students will acquire the skill necessary to realize said projects and research. Furthermore, as students who enroll in IAMAS possess knowledge and experience from multiple disciplines, we provide “Introductory Classes” as the necessary common base for advancing their research. This will students to build a foothold for the acquirement of broad knowledge and skills as well as a research goal early on.

Motif Work

Course Objectives/ Description

Motif Work is divided into two parts. The earlier part lasts one week, faculty and students will all give a presentation and through discussion and field work will deepen their mutual understanding as members of IAMAS. The presentations will embody the participants’ diverse backgrounds and perspectives. During group discussions, groups will be rearranged as the occasion demands, and we will search for the essence of our media creations from among these various relationships. During fieldwork, we will go outside the school to deepen our understanding of the region and to explore the possibilities of how we might use it.

In the latter part, we will divide into groups to analyze the work we have done in class up to this point. By objectively deepening our investigations from diverse perspectives, we will examine further possibilities for our work.

Course Format

Presentation, discussion, fieldwork, group work

Course Plan/Overview

We will engage in fieldwork, investigation, and discussion individually or in groups. Finally, we will hold presentations and write reports of the results of our work.

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be introduced as necessary in class..

Information Studies Foundation

Course Objectives/ Description

Nowadays, Information Technology lies at the heart of every rapidly progressing technology and service. Even as its role increases in importance, we are becoming less and less conscious of this technology while it becomes more and more generalized. In this course, we will look at IT from a bird’s eye view; and, while re-recognizing its importance, we will aim to pull it within our reach. We will not only learn techniques, but we will also become conscious of how they are used, and how we would like to use them. To accomplish this, we will experience in general the process from proposing an idea to its actualization. The course is conducted in a hands-on style based on concrete themes.

Course Format

Seminar, report, etc.

Course Plan/Overview

  • Basic programming philosophy
  • About the development environment
  • Drafting plans
  • Field work for plans
  • Plan development and feedback
  • Summary

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be indicated and distributed and necessary

Foundations of Media Creation

Instructors

Course Objectives/ Description

In this class, we will acquire those techniques and ways of thinking that form the foundation of Media Creation by creating interactive installation pieces. Under the guidance of instructors with a great deal of practical experience, we will conduct an intensive study of what goes on behind an exhibition, how to conceive of the exhibition space, and of the techniques and technological aspects of set-up.

Course Format

Seminar

Course Plan/Overview

Day 1:
(Block 1) Introduction, explanation of tasks
(Blocks 2-4) Projector set-up seminar
Day 2:
(Blocks 5-7) Idea-sketching, experiments using projectors
(Bock 8) Plan presentation
Day 3:
(Blocks 9-12) Production exhibition
Day 4:
(Block 13) Production exhibition
(Blocks 14-15) Critique

General Studies A (Contemporary Aesthetics)

Course Objectives/ Description

We will think about the question “what is popular culture?” This issue is deeply connected to contemporary art and media art.

People may be prone to regard popular culture as simply those cultural commodities created for amusement. However, if we try to examine the matter more carefully, we can there discover various key clues for thinking about people and society. We will consider the questions: What can we validly say about elements of pop culture like anime, manga and games? What is it to research and critique these things? What sort of change do they indicate in our culture?

Course Format

The 3 instructors will conduct this course as a relay lecture. Yoshioka will act as representative and explain the course during the first lecture, but for a more detailed plan, please follow the instructions of each instructor.

Course Plan/Overview

“Popular culture & modern artistic culture” 6/6 (Yoshioka)

In this lecture, we will attempt an objective explanation of how we should perceive “popular culture”, what caused it to be distinguished from other types of culture, and what makes culture “popular”. When doing so, even if we don’t become critically aware of the root structure of modernistic, artistic views that we are currently unconsciously internalizing, speak about it, and are aware of it every day, the questions of “What is artistic culture? What is ‘high culture’? And what are they supported by?” will surface. In this course, we will discuss the framework for the concept of this “culture” – which came into existence in the civil society of modern Western Europe and was introduced to Japan after the Meiji era – on the basis of a history of thought genealogy. We will especially think about the functions that Hegel and Marx, as well as Hegelianism and Marxism accomplished (and is still accomplishing) both explicitly and unconsciously. The above content will be split into two lectures.

“Popular culture & media technology” 6/21, 7/12 (Muroi)

Currently, that which is called “popular culture” is decisively different from the popular culture in the pre-modern age, and cannot be thought about without taking into account the progress of media and technology. In “popular culture”, technology will not be foregrounded in one area and be made aware of in another area. However, going beyond those superficial phenomena, no one can deny that technology is one of popular culture’s “requirements for possible existence”. In that context, asking about popular culture, asking about technology, and is none other than asking about the media technology after the popularization of computers.

Now, has media technology after the computer brought about something new to our world-views or bodies? While looking back at the various arguments regarding technology after the photograph, we will think about this using our own specific experiences of being exposed to new media. Rather than as an opposition or a coexistence, we will re-perceive the problems of technology and science as something that started from the same activity, and will think about the possibility of a new “practical art” that is not a media art as a genre that has been integrated into the global market or economic activities while having discussions. After going through those discussions, we will return to the question of how we should perceive “popular culture”.

The above content will be split into 3 lectures.

“Are the aesthetics of popular culture possible?” 6/14, 6/28 (Akiba)

Aesthetics are originally part of modern learning, and has developed as a role of “art” post civil society as well as something inseparable from that system. In other words, after it began existing, aesthetics was a “modern” concept. In that case, in a postmodern, or a post-postmodern situation, what role can aesthetics carry out? Above all, when faced with “popular culture” where that range of access and social functions are largely different, what kinds of challenges are imposed on aesthetics? In order to think about and analyze “popular culture”, in what way is it necessary for aesthetics to change itself? And is aesthetics even necessary for popular culture? In order to think about those fundamental questions, we will re-examine the Critique of Judgment, written by Kant, the forefather of modern aesthetics, as well as its historic reception. That is because Kant’s ideology, while being the beginning of the modern age, is also the limit of metaphysics in old Europe and, in that context, is exceedingly important when questioning the possibility of aesthetics in relation to “popular culture”.

“What is popular culture?” 7/21 (Akiba, Muroi, Yoshioka)

During the last class, the 3 instructors plan to gather together and have a thorough discussion with the students on the topics that were covered in the course until that point.

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

Will be designated or distributed in class.

General Studies B (Representation and Culture Theory)

Instructors

Course Objectives/ Description

In order to comprehend practical and contemporary issues surrounding media creation (what is here called media creation is not restricted to art and design, but also includes both grander and more minute social and mental creations) we will give examples of various eras, people, and works; and, to motivate our studies, we will consciously consider which if any thoughts=intentions=preferences are possible or necessary for us as creators or researchers.

Course Format

Classroom lecture

Course Plan/Overview

The figures presented in the course are more or less as follows (in no particular order):

Levi-Strauss, Michel Foucault, Merleau-Ponty, Jaques Lacan, Gilles Deleuze, Shuzo Kuki, Tatsumi Hijikata, Yukio Mishima, Toshihiko Izutsu, etc.

The themes presented in this course are more or less as follows (in no particular order):

Contemporary thought, aesthetics/art history, artistic anatomy, dance and body theory, art criticism, body theory, medical anthropology, art therapy, thanatology, etc.

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be introduced in class as needed

General Studies C (Media・The Environment・Art)

Course Objectives/ Description

An historical overview of media creation from 1945 to the present.

Each instructor will present ideas from their differing areas of specialization, aiming to traverse the development of media technology, transitions in media literacy, and the expansion of contemporary art. The instructors’ fields of expertise are computer science, networks, visual media studies, and art.

We hope that these lectures provide tools for students to construct the context (historical perspective) of their own work as a preparation for their graduate projects and theses.

Course Format

Lecture, discussion.

Course Plan/Overview

There will be a total of 15 lectures.
In general, during each session each of the instructors will lecture on a designated topic from their area of expertise.

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be distributed in class as necessary. For example:
Other materials include periodicals, exhibition catalogs, etc.

Art Theory A (Information × Art)

Course Objectives/ Description

We will investigate creations in the field of music, film, and contemporary art by combining the perspectives of the authors themselves.

Course Format

Lecture and seminar

Course Plan/Overview

Video Creation (Instructor: Maeda)

In this lecture we will investigate a number of issues from a variety of perspectives: the state of temporal art now that viewing randomly accessible video has become standard, the potential of theater now that real-time video transmission via mobile device is not uncommon, and the nature of video creation in this era in which we live simultaneously in the real world and the world of information.
・Film history/photography/experimental film/video art

Installation (Instructor: Ando)

We will conceive of an installation as not simply a form of artistic expression, but also as an area of boundary where symbolic space and real space interpenetrate one another or infringe on each other's territory. In class, we will pick out a few examples of artwork to consider, focusing on their media characteristics, the frame of their representation/image, the exhibition space, and the observer's gaze.
・Painting and installation/site-specific art/video installation

Music and Composition (Instructor: Miwa)

What the heck does it mean to create music or compose in today's media society? Starting from concrete examples of "composition" using computers, we will think about the future of musical and artistic creation.
・Computer music/algorithmic composition

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be designated or distributed in class.

Art Theory B (Body × Art)

Instructors

Course Objectives/ Description

We will measure the art creation (including media creation) from the three points of . That is, we will try to prove the (im)possibility of responding to the fundamental question: “what even is ‘creative expression’ in the first place?” We will do through using various methods: art-historical investigation, body-theory analysis, and philosophical inquiry. This year in particular we will approach our body-theory analysis from the two directions of medicine and art.

Course Format

Intensive course (classroom lecture)

Course Plan/Overview

  • Art history subject matter: Vermeer, Giacometti, Magritte, Duchamp, Cy Twombly, etc.
  • Body theory subject matter: Ishinha, Dumb Type, Gekidan Taihen, Hijikata Tatsumi, ROSAS, etc.
  • Philosophical subject matter: Kant, Adorno, Derrida, Stiegler, Nihsida Kitaro, etc.
  • Contemporary subject matter: body modification, cosplay, J-POP, SNS, AKB48, etc.

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be introduced in class as necessary.

Art Theory C (Media × Art)

Course Objectives/ Description

The form of creative expression called Media art – which came onto the scene in the beginning of the 1990’s, incorporating upgradable information technology and spanning multiple disciplines – is not just an unprecedented method of connecting old and new media. It can also be thought of as a movement of inventing new media, a way of being that breaks with pre-existing frames. It has become necessary to reexamine the significance and potential of “media art” in contemporary society where interconnected issues are shared by all: the transformation of communication represented by social media, natural disasters, and environmental and energy problems, etc. This may lead us examine human existence and its relationship with the world. In each class, the guiding instructors will give examples in line with the course’s theme from each of their perspectives; then, we will raise, analyze, and examine various related issues. We anticipate a positive exchange of ideas through classroom discussion.

Course Format

Lecture and discussion

Course Plan/Overview

Instructor: Shikata

The development of media art/environmental unconsciousness/expanded curation

Instructor: Maebayashi

About Interaction/environment and perception, perception and representation/ media and reality/creating sense

Instructor: Akamatsu

The physicality surrounding art and media/ sensuousness/ ordinariness/ connectivity/ laterality/ commercialization/ critical cycling

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be distributed in class as necessary

Information Society Theory A (Information × Society)

Course Objectives/ Description

All our activities contain some kind of sociality; but, in modern society the contents and form of our social activities have become extremely diverse in tandem with transitions in information technology and information models. On the other hand, social knowledge is provided at every level of society – be it micro, macro, or meta – in the form of learning and problem-solving skills derived from interaction with people. While focusing on the state of the knowledge that society can create and the related information-problems that it contains, we will set about answering the question of how we can “design” society. In this course we will outline what the changing social models and lifestyles demand of information technology; and, conversely, what influence the evolution of information models has had on all sorts of activities and social models within society. Also, we will look at the new, future possibilities for social and information models, all while giving specific examples.

Course Format

Lecture, discussion.
Assignments will be given based on the lectures.

Course Plan/Overview

  • Sessions One and Two (10/6, Dominic):
    The critical implementation of information technology: Applying concepts/ prototyping
  • Session Three (10/12, Yoshida):
    Transitions in information models and changes in society (chronological order)
  • Session Four (10/13, Yoshida):
    Coordinated mechanisms and social transition (ordered by association)
  • Sessions Five and Six (10/26, 11/2, Yoshida):
    Assignment presentation and discussion about information models and changes in society.
  • Session Seven and Eight (11/10, Dominic):
    The critical implementation of information technology: Applying concepts/ prototyping
  • Session Nine (12/1, Yoshida):
    Assignment presentation and discussion about information models and changes in society.
  • Session Ten (12/8, Kanayama):
    Community and society/ community design
  • Session 11 (12/14, Kanayama):
    Community and society/ community design
  • Session 12 (12/15):
    Community and society/ community design
  • Sessions 13 and 14 (1/19 Dominic):
    The critical implementation of information technology: Applying concepts/ prototyping
  • Session 15 (1/26 Kanayama)
    Community and society/ community design

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be distributed or indicated as necessary.

Information Society Theory B (Body × Society)

Course Objectives/ Description

“Information and society” seen through the lens of Culture and Representation Studies becomes “body and city.” While introducing prominent examples from the past, we will attempt to extrapolate on these to find out if, at present, the body displays any aspects of the city. Our goal is to experience in the classroom the dynamism of body and city – two elements which at times show the same face, and at times evoke an incompatible opposition.

Course Format

The three professors will each lead solo lectures as well as discussion format classes.

Course Plan/Overview

  • Benjamin on the city
  • Benjamin on photography
  • Beckett on theatre
  • Beckett on the city
  • Barthes on photography
  • Barthes on the media
  • Foucault on insanity
  • Foucault on the prison

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be introduced in class.

Information Society Theory C (Media×Society)

Instructors

Course Objectives/ Description

Historically, it can be said that general media began as an instrument of war; but, following that, mass media developed and has come to have a close influence our daily lives. However, mass media’s conventional role is about end, and its future diversification is predicted. When we take this societal background into account, it becomes necessary not to passively absorb media as in the past, but rather to select and use the proper media after grasping its characteristics, or to customize it depending on the situation; and, furthermore, to create it oneself. For that purpose, this course will leap beyond conventional perspectives to try and grasp the present diversification of media from new angles. We will also examine and analyze a wide array of examples. Our goal is to explore new proposals derived from these case studies, and to search for an ideal image of future media.

Course Format

Classroom lecture, presentations, workshops, etc.

Course Plan/Overview

1. Course Introduction + Media and Society

We will outline the course, take up the issue of media's contemporary state, and get a general overview of the relationship between media and society, and perhaps media and the individual.

2-4. Methods for Investigating Media and Society

We will look at the tangent of media and society in the internet age through variegated points of view, and we will learn about processes and mechanisms for designing them.

5-7. Extracting Issues of Media and Society

We will examine the current situation of media and society through research and fieldwork, and we will attempt to extract problems from this.

8-11. Analysis and Proposals Concerning Media and Society

We will simultaneously explore a new value analysis of the problems we identified and propose ways of addressing them. We will use this to concretely test the methods and mechanisms that we have previously learned.

12-14. The Future of Media and Society

We will examine the trial results of our proposed media and think about the future of media and society.

15. Summary and Conclusion

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be distributed or indicated as necessary.

Design Theory A (Information × Design)

Course Objectives/ Description

How has the shape and significance of information changed, and how has it come to be stored, through media? How has it transformed the way people receive information? Society and people’s livelihoods have undergone great change due to the influence of Media Design, and we will objectively examine the positive and negative aspects of these changes.

We will come to understand various tendencies within society; and, looking at their structure, systems, etc., we will comprehensively discuss the future of design.

Course Format

Lecture and discussion.
Before each session there is a report to turn in based on a reading in Japanese or English.

Course Plan/Overview

Sample Classes from 2016:

  • General-purpose technology and creative expression.
  • The history of design after World War II.
  • Speculative Design
  • The "present" of Modernology
  • Guest Lectures:
    Kinya Tagawa (Representative, takram design engineering)
    Shohei Matsukawa (Associate Professor, Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University SFC)
    Akihito Kubota (Professor, Art and Information Course, Department of Information Design, Tama Art University)

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be distributed as necessary.

Design Theory B (The Body ×Design)

Course Objectives/ Description

Our bodies’ capabilities continue to expand and alter together with the evolution of technology. In this lecture, we will look at specific examples of research and technology connected with this matter, and we will investigate about what “design” means for the body.

In the first half of the course, we will study in lecture and group-reading format about how relationships and communication that have been changed by perception devices and social networks. In the latter half, we adopt a seminar format and apply our knowledge to analyze preexisting research and to investigate and propose new kinds of interface, interface whose purpose is to transform the body and the environment surrounding it.

Course Format

Lecture, group reading

Course Plan/Overview

  • Concerning the singularity
  • Concerning the pre-singularity
  • Contemporary examples of advanced research
  • Concerning the future of humanity

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

  • Kurzweil, Ray. The Singularity is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology. NHK Publishing, Inc.
  • Saito, Motoaki.The Singular Impact of Exa-Scale Computing on Us. PHP Institute.

Others will be distributed or indicated and necessary.

Design Theory C (Media×Design)

Course Objectives/ Description

Our predecessors have created various theories and methodologies concerning design. However, these ideas are not realistically practicable just as they are. Through review and discussion of topics like design processes, digital fabrication, and interaction, we will gain expertise and study theories and methodologies necessary for progressing our research.

Course Format

The basic format of the course is as follows: Each student is assigned a text from the appointed list. The student will carefully read and summarize the text, then give a presentation. Based on this, we will deepen our understanding through a discussion from the class members' perspectives. This we be repeated each session. English will be the basic language of communication.

Course Plan/Overview

Students will take turns reading and presenting, and the class will have a discussion based on this.

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

Appropriate texts in English or Japanese will be decided when the course begins. For reference, last year we read English texts about the design process and digital fabrication.

Project Techniques Seminar

Course Objectives/ Description

This is an omnibus course whose goal is to provide students with training in advanced manufacturing equipment – the arms and legs of creative expression – and to help them acquire the practical skills that are its eyes and ears, all of which they will implement in the Project courses. Students practice identifying problems in contemporary society and thinking of ways to solve them; through this, we aim teach them how to build theories that will serve as a foundation for practical concerns and as a basis for a multifaceted perspective rather that one of non-self-sufficient specialization. We also aim to teach students specific research methods to be used throughout the process of writing a report: the acquisition of research skills, the cultivation of the ability to use facts to support knowledge which forms the basis of those skills, basic theories, and data collection/analysis for writing papers and developing investigation methods. By diligently proceeding along this research path and summarizing each step as “mini research” we will engage in academic training, considering how to reconfigure our theories regarding those skills and practices required by researchers in any field. The purpose of this training is to grasp the matters before us from multiple perspectives and convey the results of our findings in an academic paper.

Course Format

Lecture, presentation, workshop

Course Plan/Overview

Reading Papers:

We will learn how to read efficiently and how to examine papers, skills which are invariably necessary when writing a research paper.

Structuring Contents:

We will learn those things which one needs to know when writing a paper: the function of the paper, its rules, etc.

Social Research/ Behavioral Analysis/ Statistical Analysis:

We will learn analysis and investigation techniques for understanding user reactions and intentions without leaving any out. These techniques are to be used in the initial assessment of needs and identification of problems, as well as to the evaluation of prototypes during the feedback phase.

Computer Science:

We will learn engineering methods that involve information processing, incorporating programming, etc.

3D Printer/ Laser Cutter Seminar:

We will learn the latest modeling techniques from the use of laminate 3D printers to the operation of Computer-Aided Design. Likewise, we will also learn how to use laser cutting and engraving machines, aiming to strengthen our prototype-modeling ability.

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

Texts will be distributed at the appropriate time, and will be introduced in class as necessary.

Information Design Seminar

Course Objectives/ Description

Using research on design methods and thought diagrams, we will investigate the validity of design thinking and development methodologies. Setting a concrete theme for our work, we will come to understand the complex reciprocal information-relationship that connects user to object, engage in design development and prototyping, document our work, and improve our presentation skills. Through lectures and seminars, we will examine information design as it relates to media, focusing on internet-based graphic design methods, and we will come to understand the structure of design within web design. The concept of web “information architecture” will become prevalent as people now recognize the important of structure, and will come to understand the structuralization of design within web design. While studying the basic modeling languages of graphic design, we will deepen our understanding of design that effectively conveys a message.

Course Format

Lecture, practice, and discussion.

Course Plan/Overview

Instructor: Furukata (8/23)

We will learn algorithmic techniques for creating graphics. "Drawing and painting" generally refers to graphic creation by hand using a brush or writing implement; however, in this class we will use programming to construct "systematic" drawings. With manual tools, one can incorporate bodily inflections into the work, but it is difficult to make this work repeatable, regular, and mass-producible. We will utilize the JavaScript function packaged with Illustrator to experientially study methods of algorithmic drawing via computer.

Instructor: Andreas Schneider (9/4)

  1. Overview of Design Thinking Methods and Models
  2. Introduction to Design Factors: Background, Design Specific Views, Extended Views
  3. Identification of Specific Use-Cases
  4. Analysis and References
  5. Proposition
  6. Conclusion / Presentation

Instructor: Nakaya (9/8)

Documentation and presentation.

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

Texts will be introduced and distributed as necessary. .

Media Design Seminar

Course Objectives/ Description

We will systematically study design – a field whose domain has been expanded been expanded by digital technology – from print to photography and electronic media. We will also study those areas of knowledge peripheral to design and thereby investigate the confluent relationship of these elements.

Course Format

Workshop and intensive lecture

Course Plan/Overview

  • Influential relationship of media 1 (Designing Program)
  • Influential relationship of media 2 (Parametric Design)
  • Communication via characters 1(Typeface Design)
  • Communication via characters 2 (Typography)
  • Communication via illustrations 1 (Infographics)
  • Communication via illustrations 2 (Data Visualization)

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

None in particular. Will be distributed if necessary.

Interactive Media Seminar

Instructors

Course Objectives/ Description

Through the individual fabrication of interactive electronic devices, we will experience the process of production from generating an idea to circuit-board-mounting, programming, modeling, and presentation.

Using designated materials and devices, we will repeatedly attempt various interaction trials, extract from these that which we intuitively feel is interesting, analyze this, and search for ways in which me might popularize our findings.

Course Format

Production practice and discussion.

Course Plan/Overview

  • Materials and play
  • Gathering and analyzing feelings
  • Circuit boards and programs
  • Modelling
  • Exhibition

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

These will be introduced in class as necessary.

Practical Project Studies I・II・III・IV

Course Objectives/ Description

The Project Course, made up of Practical Project Studies I・II・III・IV, is one of the most characteristic courses of our school. This important course serves as the framework for students’ graduate research. Through these interdisciplinary projects, we endeavor to measure the social significance of media creation, share the results of our work with society, and maintain an environment of strong collaboration with those outside the school. By means of these cooperative activities, students acquire experience and know-how in multiple fields, and seek to effectively synthesize this knowledge for use in still more advanced research and technological development. Also, while pursuing educational effectiveness within the school, we hope to give back to the outside by sharing the results of our projects. These interdisciplinary course aims to help students develop a comprehensive perspective, planning skills, organizational ability, and management experience in guiding an idea through to its realization. For more details about each project, please refer to the project syllabi under the 2.9 project list.

Course Plan/Overview

Students will proceed with research based on meetings decided each project or as occasion demands. The results of project research will be presented during events for academic exchange –conferences or study groups – at exhibitions within and without the school, and at school-managed events or open houses.

Special Research 1・2A・2B

Course Objectives/ Description

Designated instructors will guide students in graduate research, its process, and its problem-solving methodologies. The primary faculty members are all qualified to guide research in their field. Should a student choose to tackle a subject that spans multiple fields, a similarly qualified secondary faculty member will be assigned. Even in the case of multiple advising faculty members, the lion’s share of responsibility will fall to the main faculty advisor. Final evaluation will be conducted by the main advisor and the two secondary advisors. Special Research 1 and 2 correspond to each student year. Second year students take 2A in the first half of the year, and 2 B in the second. To receive credit in this course, students receive do not just receive active guidance, but must also conduct interviews with multiple faculty members (explaining their intentions for their research / productions as well as its contents and their current state of progress, and then receiving the instructors’ opinions and advice.) First year students must present their work, give a research progress report, and submit a written progress report during the Annual Work Presentation. Second year students must give a research proposal, progress report, final presentation, etc., in order to obtain their degree.

Course Format

Seminar, consultation, presentation.

Course Plan/Overview

  • Annual Work Presentation.
  • Research reports (Research proposal, progress report)
  • Special consultation

Textbooks/ Reference Materials

Suitable materials will be introduced by the faculty advisor in accordance with the student's research topic.