Classes

Classes feature the organization of individual, group, and society. “Special Research Classes” are classes that feature team teaching via seminars where students will acquire the necessary methods and skills for problem solutions in their research activities. In “General Studies Classes”, students will critique project and research achievements and question their social significance. Also, we provide “Specialized Classes”, where students will the necessary knowledge for implementing projects and research, and “Production Seminar Classes”, where students will acquire the skill necessary to realize said projects and research. Furthermore, as students who enroll in IAMAS possess knowledge and experience from multiple disciplines, we provide “Introductory Classes” as the necessary common base for advancing their research. This will students to build a foothold for the acquirement of broad knowledge and skills as well as a research goal early on.

Motif Work

Class targets/characteristics

Motif Work is constructed from 2 parts, the first half and second half. In the first half, for the period of approximately one week, faculty and students will deepen their understanding as members of IAMAS through presentations, group discussions, and fieldwork. In presentations, participants, with their various backgrounds, will materialize their points of view. In group discussions, rearranging members as needed, participants will research the state of their own media expressions from various related connections. In fieldwork, participants will go to locations off-campus and, while deepening their understanding of the region, will investigate the potential for its application.

In the second half, following the themes they were given, participants will conduct group work with faculty joining as group members. In groups, members will take notice of not only their knowledge and skills, but also the various abilities each member has. And using these to their utmost ability, students will be able to think about how group work, which is based on the difference in everyone’s way of thinking, should be by actually experiencing it.

Class format

Presentations, discussions, fieldwork, group work

Class plan/points

Students will conduct fieldwork, surveys, and discussions individually or in groups. Students will conduct presentations and submit reports for their final results.

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will introduce as necessary.

Information Studies Foundation

Class targets/characteristics

Information technology lies at the foundation of every technology and service that is currently progressing intensely, and its role, while increasing its importance, is also rapidly going mainstream and becoming instinctual. In this class, we will overview that information technology, and, while reconfirming its importance, will aim to pull it in until it is within our reach. Rather than just learning techniques, we will experience everything from proposal of designs to actualization in a hands-on training style that is based on a specific theme so that we can be aware of how the techniques are used and how we want to use them.

Class format

Practical exercises, reports, etc.

Class plan/points

  • Basic way of thinking for programming
  • About the development environment
  • Planning
  • Field work for planning
  • Development and feedback based on planning
  • Conclusion

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will introduce as necessary.

Expression in Media Foundation

Instructors

Class targets/characteristics

In this class, we will learn the techniques and ways of thinking that will be the foundation for media expressions through the creation of interactive installation works. Under the instruction of lecturers that have taken part in many actual practices, we will aim to intensively learn about the reverse side of exhibitions and the way to perceive exhibition spaces, as well as the techniques and technical aspects related to setting up exhibitions.

Class format

Seminar

Class plan/points

  • 1st class: Introduction
  • 2nd – 3rd classes: Foundation seminars
  • 4th – 6th classes: Group work-1
  • 7th class: Interim presentation-1
  • 8th – 10th classes: Group work-2
  • 11th class: Interim presentation-2
  • 12th – 13th classes: Final creation
  • 14th class: Feedback

General Studies A (Aesthetics x Culture x Society)

Class targets/characteristics

Continuing from last year, we will further develop and discuss the topic of “What is popular culture?” Popular culture also has a close involvement with modern art and media art.

Popular culture is likely to be deemed simply as cultural commodities intended for amusement. However, if studied carefully, it is possible to discover various clues to thinking about people and society. For popular culture such as anime, manga, video games, etc., we will discuss the topics of what way can they effectively narrate, what reviewing and researching them entails, what kind of future do they indicate for our culture.

Class format

The 3 instructors will conduct this course as a relay lecture. Yoshioka will act as representative and explain the course during the first lecture, but for a more detailed plan, please follow the instructions of each instructor.

Class plan/points

“Popular culture & modern artistic culture” 6/6 (Yoshioka)

In this lecture, we will attempt an objective explanation of how we should perceive “popular culture”, what caused it to be distinguished from other types of culture, and what makes culture “popular”. When doing so, even if we don’t become critically aware of the root structure of modernistic, artistic views that we are currently unconsciously internalizing, speak about it, and are aware of it every day, the questions of “What is artistic culture? What is ‘high culture’? And what are they supported by?” will surface. In this course, we will discuss the framework for the concept of this “culture” – which came into existence in the civil society of modern Western Europe and was introduced to Japan after the Meiji era – on the basis of a history of thought genealogy. We will especially think about the functions that Hegel and Marx, as well as Hegelianism and Marxism accomplished (and is still accomplishing) both explicitly and unconsciously. The above content will be split into two lectures.

“Popular culture & media technology” 6/21, 7/12 (Muroi)

Currently, that which is called “popular culture” is decisively different from the popular culture in the pre-modern age, and cannot be thought about without taking into account the progress of media and technology. In “popular culture”, technology will not be foregrounded in one area and be made aware of in another area. However, going beyond those superficial phenomena, no one can deny that technology is one of popular culture’s “requirements for possible existence”. In that context, asking about popular culture, asking about technology, and is none other than asking about the media technology after the popularization of computers.

Now, has media technology after the computer brought about something new to our world-views or bodies? While looking back at the various arguments regarding technology after the photograph, we will think about this using our own specific experiences of being exposed to new media. Rather than as an opposition or a coexistence, we will re-perceive the problems of technology and science as something that started from the same activity, and will think about the possibility of a new “practical art” that is not a media art as a genre that has been integrated into the global market or economic activities while having discussions. After going through those discussions, we will return to the question of how we should perceive “popular culture”.

The above content will be split into 3 lectures.

“Are the aesthetics of popular culture possible?” 6/14, 6/28 (Akiba)

Aesthetics are originally part of modern learning, and has developed as a role of “art” post civil society as well as something inseparable from that system. In other words, after it began existing, aesthetics was a “modern” concept. In that case, in a postmodern, or a post-postmodern situation, what role can aesthetics carry out? Above all, when faced with “popular culture” where that range of access and social functions are largely different, what kinds of challenges are imposed on aesthetics? In order to think about and analyze “popular culture”, in what way is it necessary for aesthetics to change itself? And is aesthetics even necessary for popular culture? In order to think about those fundamental questions, we will re-examine the Critique of Judgment, written by Kant, the forefather of modern aesthetics, as well as its historic reception. That is because Kant’s ideology, while being the beginning of the modern age, is also the limit of metaphysics in old Europe and, in that context, is exceedingly important when questioning the possibility of aesthetics in relation to “popular culture”.

“What is popular culture?” 7/21 (Akiba, Muroi, Yoshioka)

During the last class, the 3 instructors plan to gather together and have a thorough discussion with the students on the topics that were covered in the course until that point.

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will be designated or distributed in class.

General Studies B (Representation x Culture)

Instructors

Class targets/characteristics

In order to comprehend the realistic and modern problems related to media expression (this media expression isn’t restricted to art and design, and includes more extensive and precise social expressions and psychological expressions), students will use various periods, people and works as examples, and be given the opportunity to think subjectively about what kind of thoughts, intentions and preferences are possible and necessary as an expressionist or researcher.

Class format

Lecture (classroom lecture)

Class plan/points

Persons to be featured in class are approximately the following (in no particular order);

Lévi-Strauss, Michel Foucault, Merleau-Ponty, Roland Barthes, Jacques Lacan, Gilles Deleuze, Shuzo Kuki, Tatsumi Hijikata, Yukio Mishima, Toshihiko Izutsu, etc.

Themes to be featured in class are approximately the following (in no particular order);
Contemporary thought, aesthetics & art history, art anatomy, dance body theory, art criticism, body theory, medical anthropology, art therapy, theory of life and death, etc.

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will introduce in class as necessary.

General Studies C (Body×Information×Media)

Class targets/characteristics

In the present day, information, body and media are treated as mostly one thing, and if even one of those is missing, it is now becoming so that it would not be possible to represent the present day. However, of course, there are several problems that arise from treating those three as one single thing. In this course, while aiming for the understanding of the present condition of “information”, “body”, and “media”, we will investigate how those areas have been communicated and understood in IAMAS, and explore the ideal state of the coming “information × body × media” hybrid.

Class format

Lecture, discussion, workshop

Class plan/points

Theme: “Information science of archives”

Archives do not refer to the accumulation of information that has simply been gathered and sorted. They instantly connect the present and the past, and with archives, encounters with “not yet seen information” that can form a bridge to the future are expected.

In this course, each instructor will speak about the “legitimate opinion” of archives from professional/specialized standpoints, and by doing so we will attempt a development so that the course itself carries the significance of a great archive.

  • (Yoshida) Networks & Archives
  • (Matsui) Formulas for Archivology
  • (Kobayashi) Contemporary Philosophy & Archives

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will introduce in class as necessary.

Art Theory A (Information × Art)

Class targets/characteristics

We will discuss expressions in music, video, modern art, and media art, while mixing in the perspectives of actual creators.

Class format

Lectures and exercises

Class plan/points

Video Expressions (Instructor: Maeda)

We will discuss the concept of time art in the present day, where random accessible video viewing has become the norm; the potential of theatre in an age of video sharing where real-time transmission from a mobile device is no longer rare; and, from various perspectives, video expressions of this age where we live in both the real world and information environments.
・Film history / photographic expressions / experimental films / video art

Installations (Instructor: Ando)

We will re-perceive installations not as a single form of expression, but as boundary region where symbolic spaces and actual spaces encroach on or permeate each other. In this course, we will select several artistic representations, and reflect on them with their media characteristics, symbolic and image frameworks, exhibition spaces, and the gazes of viewers.
・ Paintings & installations / site specific / video installations

Music & Composition (Instructor: Miwa)

In this media society, what is creating music and composing? Using specific practices of “composition” that utilizes computers, we will consider future music and artistic creation.
・ Computer music/algorithmic composition

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will designate or distribute in class.

Art Theory B (Body × Art)

Instructors

Class targets/characteristics

In this course, we will measure artistic expressions from the 3 standpoints of history, body, and philosophy. In other words, using the methods of art historic examination in expressions, body theoretic analysis and philosophic research, we will verify the impossibility of an answer in relation to fundamental question of “Precisely what is “expression”? This year we will particularly place emphasis on analysis of symbolic and cultural historical and art historical aspects.

Class format

Intensive course (Classroom lectures)

Class plan/points

  • Artistic subject matter: Vermeer, Giacometti, Magritte, Duchamp, Cy Twombly, etc.
  • Body theory subject matter: Ishinha, Dumb Type, performance troupe TAIHEN, Tatsumi Hijikata, ROSAS, etc.
  • Philosophic subject matter: Kant, Adorno, Derrida, Stiegler, Kitaro Nishida, etc.
  • Modern subject matter: body deformation, cosplay, J-POP, SNS, AKB48, etc.

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will introduce in class as necessary.

Art Theory C (Media × Art)

Class targets/characteristics

“Media art”, which appeared at the beginning of 1990, quickly adopted renewing information technology, crossed several areas, and not only linked new and old media in never before seen methods, invented new medias. And media art’s ideal state can be perceived as a movement that diverges from existing frames. Now, the transfiguration of communication (which is represented by social media) natural disasters, environment and energy problems, and other various problems connect and are shared by everyone. In a society such as that, it is becoming necessary to once again examine the significance and potential that media art possesses. And at the same time, that will surely become a reexamination of the relationship between us and the world. In every class, instructors will give examples from their own perspectives that follow the theme, raise questions, and conduct analyses and examinations. And students can look forward to a positive exchange of opinions via discussion.

Class format

Lectures & discussions

Class plan/points

Instructor: Shikata

Development of media art / environmental unconsciousness / expanded curation

Instructor: Maebayashi

About interaction / environment & perception, perception & symbols / looking at the “world” through “something” / media & reality

Instructor: Akamatsu

Embodiment concerning art and media / sentience / ordinariness / connectivity / eccentricity / commerciality

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will introduce in class as necessary.

Information Society Theory A (Information × Society)

Class targets/characteristics

Our activities all carry some kind of sociality, and in modern society, that accompanies the changes in information technology and information models, and the substance and shape of social activities is becoming extremely varied. At the same time/meanwhile/in turn, at all micro, macro, and meta levels of society, social knowledge can be given as an ability to conduct problem solving and learning from interaction with people. While focusing on the ideal state of knowledge created by society in this way and the information problems related therein, we will approach the question of how we can design society. In this course, we will outline what human educational activities and changes in social models have demanded from information technology, what influence the progress of information models have had on various activities and social models in society, and the potential of new social and information models from now on while offering actual cases.

Class format

Lectures, discussions
There will be report assignments related to lectures.

Class plan/points

  • 1st, 2nd class (9/23 Dominique) - Critical implementation of information technology: Concept & prototyping practice
  • 3rd class (9/30 Yoshida) - Transitions in information models and changes in society
  • 4th, 5th class (10/14 Dominique) - Critical implementation of information technology: Concept & prototyping practice
  • 6th class (10/28 Yoshida) - Future directionality and issues for information models
  • 7th class (11/11 Yoshida) - Issue presentations and discussions on information models and changes in society
  • 8th class (11/18 Yoshida) - Issue presentations and discussions on information models and changes in society
  • 9th, 10th class (12/9 Dominique) - Critical implementation of information technology: Concept & prototyping practice
  • 11th class (12/16 Yoshida) - Issue presentations and discussions on information models and changes in society
  • 12th class (1/13 Kanayama) - Community and society / community design
  • 13th class (1/20 Kanayama) - Community and society / community design
  • 14th class (1/24 Kanayama) - Community and society / community design
  • 15th class (1/27 Kanayama) - Community and society / community design

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will distribute or designate as needed.

Information Society Theory B (Body × Society)

Class targets/characteristics

“Information and society” read formative culturally is “body and city”. In this course, we will attempt to extrapolate how body and city displays all of their aspects in the modern era while introducing past outstanding examples. Body and city will, at times show the same face, and at other times evoke an exclusive opposition. And we will aim to experience that dynamism in the classroom.

Class format

Solo lectures conducted by 3 instructors and classes conducted via dialogue

Class plan/points

  • Benjamin’s city theory
  • Benjamin’s theory of photography
  • Beckett’s theatre theory
  • Beckett’s city theory
  • Barthes’s theory of photography
  • Barthes’s media theory
  • Foucalt’s theory of madness
  • Foucalt’s prison theory

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will introduce in class.

Information Society Theory C (Media×Society)

Instructors

Class targets/characteristics

If you base things on historic progress, it is said that general media was started as one tool of war, but afterwards mass media developed and became closely related to our lives. However, the role of conventional mass media is ending, and it is assumed that hereafter it will diversify. Taking that kind of social background into account, it will become necessary to, after grasping the characteristics, choose and utilize, or, as the situation requires, customize and create the appropriate media rather than using the previous passive media. In order to do so, in this course, we will rapidly progress from a conventional perspective of diversifying media’s current condition, attempt to perceive it from a new perspective and conduct examinations and analyses for a broad range of cases. In addition, we aim to explore new proposals from these case analyses, and research the future image of appropriate media.

Class format

Classroom lectures, presentations, workshops, etc.

Class plan/points

1. Class explanation + Media and society

Will give an explanation of the class outline, and, covering the state of current media, we will review the relationship between media and society, or the individual and media.

2-4. Methods for investigating media and society

We will look at the common ground for society and media in the age of the Internet from diverse points of view, and learn about methods and structures to design them.

5-7. Extracting issues from media and society

Through research and fieldwork, we will investigate the present condition in media and society, and attempt to extract issues from it.

8-11. Analyses and proposals related to media and society

We will simultaneously analyze the new value of the extracted issues, and search for proposals for them. We will also objectively attempt the methods and structures we learned.

12-14. The future of media and society

Based on the current situation of media, which has fulfilled the role of an infrastructure of society, we will think about the ideal state of future media and society in relation to our analyses and proposals.

15. Conclusion

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will distribute or designate as necessary.

Design Theory A (Information × Design)

Class targets/characteristics

Through media, how has information changed its significance and form, and how has it accumulated? And, through the design of media, society and people’s livelihoods have changed greatly, and we will objectively inspect the merits and demerits brought about by that change.

We will decipher the various trends in society, and panoramically discuss the structure, workings, etc. of future design.

Class format

Lectures and discussions
Students will read texts (including texts in English) before each class and submit reports.

Class plan/points

Lecture examples from 2015

  • Maker
  • Visual Identity
  • Speculative Design
  • FAB society investigative commission
  • Parallel worlds
  • DARKNET
  • Guest lectures
  • After interaction
  • Art projects
  • Methods of global control

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will distribute as necessary.

Design Theory B (Body ×Design)

Class targets/characteristics

Accompanying the evolution of technology, bodily functions are expanding/changing more and more. In this course, we will specifically take up research that closely relates to this, and examine what design is for the body. In the first half of the course, we will learn about relativity and communication that has changed due to the structure of perception and social networks through lectures andreadings. In the second half, applying this knowledge, we will do survey analysis of existing research, and examine and propose a new interface that focuses on the innovation in body and the environment that surrounds it.

Class format

Lectures, readings

Class plan/points

  • About the expansion of consciousness through the internet
  • About the expansion of bodily functions through media techniques
  • Introduction and examination of representative research
  • Techniques hereafter

Textbooks & Reference Materials

  • Ray Kurzweil – Kasoku suru technology / NHK Publishing
  • Takuya Matsuda – Problems in 2045: The day computers surpass humanity / Kosaido Publishing
  • Shin network shikou – Sekai no shikumi wo yomitoku, Albert-László Barabási (author), Kaoru Aoki (translator)

Others will be distributed or designated as necessary.

Design Theory C (Media×Design)

Class targets/characteristics

Although, in relation to design, there are various theories and methodologies by predecessors, realistically, there are none that can be carried out. Through reviews and discussions on topics such as design process, digital fabrication, interaction, etc., we will learn the knowledge, theories, and methodologies needed for advancing research.

Class format

For the basic structure, for each class, we will decide the allocation for the designated text, and students will carefully read their own parts, summarize and present, and using that, we will deepen our understanding through discussions on everyone’s various points of view. Additionally, the language of communication will fundamentally be English.

Class plan/points

Presentations and discussions via readings of the text

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will designate an appropriate text in Japanese or English at the beginning of the course. For reference, last year we used English essays on design process and digital fabrication.

Project Techniques Seminar

Class targets/characteristics

This omnibus style course aims for the simultaneous acquisition of practical skills that will be the mouth and ears of representation, and practice with advanced processing equipment that will become the limbs for expression when implementing the Practical Project Studies courses. Through the discovery of problems in modern society and the practice of methods of problem solving, this course aims for the cultivation of theory formulation abilities based on a multifaceted outlook that isn’t self-sufficient in expertise, as well as a practical interest. Cultivating the acquisition of research abilities and the factualization of the knowledge that will be its foundation, through data collection and analysis and report writing for basic theory, survey analysis methods and thesis creation, we will aim for the acquisition of specific research methods. By diligently following each research step, and summarizing them as mini-research, students will multilaterally grasp the events before their eyes, and, in order to perfect those results as a scholarly paper, students will undergo academic training to make them consider the reconfiguration of theories toward the abilities and practice necessary for researchers in any field.

Class format

Lectures, presentations, workshops

Class plan/points

  • Thesis examination: We will learn investigation methods for theses which are necessary during the preliminary steps of research, and efficient reading methods for theses, all of which will inevitably be necessary for writing research theses and the like.
  • Content composition: We will learn about the roles and rules of theses, and all matters that one should know when writing a thesis.
  • Social examination / behavior analysis / statistical analysis: We will learn methods to perceive, investigate and analyze user reactions and intents without omitting anything. These are techniques connected to investigating the needs and discovering problems during initial stages, as well as the evaluation of prototype works during the feedback phase.
  • Information engineering: We will learn about engineering implementation methods which are mostly involved in the data processing of introductory programming and the like.
  • 3D printer & laser machining seminar: We will learn how to use layered 3D printers – which are able to create 3D objects – through operating CAD, and will learn cutting edge formative methods. And, similarly, we will learn how to use equipment that cut and engrave materials with a laser, thereby looking to strengthen prototype formation abilities.

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will distribute texts at the appropriate time.
Will introduce in class as necessary.

Information Design Seminar

Class targets/characteristics

From our research on unique design methods and thought diagrams, we will verify how effective those methodologies are in design development and ideas, and decision-making. In addition, we will set a specific theme, discern the complex, mutual relationship between object and user and the information that connects them, conduct design development and prototyping, and finally conduct presentations, improving student presentation skills. Furthermore, focusing on graphic design methods based on Internet environments, we will examine information design related to media through lectures and practice. In respect to the web, the concept of information architecture will become common, the importance of structure will be recognized, and we will comprehend the structuring of design in web design. And in graphic design, while learning figurative fundamental languages, we will deepen our understanding of design that allows us to effectively relate a message.

Class format

Lectures, practices, and discussions

Class plan/points

Instructor: Furukata (8/24)

We will learn techniques for algorithmically creating graphics. Generally, “pictures” are created using your hands and writing utensils, but in this class we will be using programming to “systematically” construct pictures. In our manual procedures, we will be able to load physical intonations into pictures, but, on the other side of that, incorporating elements such as repetition, regularity, or large quantities will be difficult. In class, we will utilize the JavaScript function that is included in Illustrator, and learn hands-on methods for constructing pictures algorithmically using a computer.

Instructor: Andreas Schneider (9/7)

  1. Overview of Design Thinking Methods and Models
  2. Introduction to Design Factors: Background, Design Specific Views, Extended Views
  3. Identification of specific Use-Cases
  4. Analysis and References
  5. Proposition
  6. Conclusion / Presentation

Instructor: Nakaya (9/9)

Documentation and presentation

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will distribute texts at the appropriate time.
Will introduce in class as necessary.

Media Design Seminar

Class targets/characteristics

From paper mediums to video and electronic media, we will systematically learn about the area of design, which has been expanded due to digital technology, and knowledge of its periphery, and examine their influential relationships.

Class format

Intensive lecture course

Class plan/points

  • Influential relationship of media 1 (Designing Program)
  • Influential relationship of media 2 (Parametric Design)
  • Communication via characters 1(Typeface Design)
  • Communication via characters 2 (Typography)
  • Communication via illustrations 1 (Infographics)
  • Communication via illustrations 2 (Data Visualization)

Textbooks & Reference Materials

None in particular.
Will distribute when necessary.

Interactive Media Seminar

Instructors

Class targets/characteristics

Through the individual creation of interactive works that have electronic devices as their axis, we will experience the process series that is conception, mounting of electronic circuits, programming, modeling and presentation.

Using the designated materials and device, we will repeat various interaction trials, extract that which we feel to be intuitively interesting, analyze it and look for methods to generalize it.

Class format

Creation practice and discussion

Class plan/points

  • Play with materials
  • Collection and analysis of senses
  • Electronic circuits and programs
  • Modeling
  • Exhibition

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Will introduce in class as necessary

Practical Project Studies I・II・III・IV

Class targets/characteristics

Practical Project Studies I, II, III, IV is one of the most distinctive courses at IAMAS, and fulfills the role of the framework for conducting Master’s research. This course measures the social significance of media representation, is strongly aware of the transmission of achievements to society and cooperations with outside parties, and is run cross-disciplinarily. The objective(s) of this course is to effectively coordinate the know-how and experience of several areas through collaborative activities, and to aim for more advanced research achievements and technological developments. Also, while pursuing educational impacts within IAMAS, this course simultaneous considers passing those achievements on to the outside world. By taking this cross-disciplinary course, students will aim to acquire a wide point of view and planning abilities, organizational skills, and management capabilities that will lead to being able to realize their ideas. For details on projects, please refer to the syllabus for each project under the List of Projects.

Class plan/points

Individuals will further their research on the basis of meetings decided in each project, in addition to as needed. Research findings for projects are set as the scholarly exchange activities in academic meetings and collegiums, exhibiting at exhibitions domestic and abroad, and presentations at events administered by IAMAS and Open House.

Special Research 1・2A・2B

Class targets/characteristics

Research guidance faculty members will serve to provide research guidance in relation to Master’s research, as well as guidance for that process, problem-solving methods, etc. Faculty members with research guidance qualifications will serve as the chief guidance faculty members. And, in the case that the subject students address covers multiple areas, deputy guidance faculty members with the appropriate qualifications will serve to do research guidance. It is in this kind of multi-guidance system that the responsibility of educational and research guidance lies with the chief guidance faculty member. Final evaluation will also be decided by the chief guidance faculty member and 2 deputy guidance faculty members. Special Research 1 & 2 correspond to both academic years, with 2A being implemented in the first semester and 2B being implemented in the second semester. In order to get credit for this course, students must not only actively receive research guidance, they must also have interviews (where they explain the intent, content, progress, etc. of their research/work, and receive comments and advice for said research/work) with multiple faculty members each semester. Also, for first year students, it is necessary to submit a work presentation, research mid-term report, and final report for their Annual Creation presentation. For second year students, a Master’s Frame Work presentation, mid-term presentation, presentation to earn Master’s degree, etc. are necessary.

Class format

Seminars, interviews, presentations

Class plan/points

  • Annual Creation Presentation
  • Research report (Master’s Frame Work presentation, mid-term presentations)
  • Special interview

Textbooks & Reference Materials

Chief guidance faculty members will introduce material suitable to students’ research themes.